Gorbachev

Napoleon and Gorbachev: Part 2, The End of a Socialist Empire

The End of a Socialist Empire by Paul Richards, PhD Russian Revolution Ends See Part I: Reflections on the End of a Revolution When I was a student studying and making some history at UC Berkeley in the 1960s, and my father, Harvey Richards (1912-2001), was filming our demonstrations, I asked him why he believed […]
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Emancipated Woman 1926 USSR poster

Napoleon and Gorbachev: Reflections on the End of a Revolution

Napoleon and Gorbachev: Reflections on the End of a Revolution by Paul Richards, PhD Part I: Revolution and Change  The two greatest revolutions in western history were the French Revolution and the Russian Revolution. They ended old worlds and started new ones. As we witness the tightening right wing grip on the US, I find […]
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Left side of history cover

The Left Side of History: The Left Side is My Side

Paul Richards’ Review of Kristen Ghodsee’s “The Left Side of History” Improvements in the lives of women and children in a socialist society are at the heart of what Kristen Ghodsee labels as “the Unfulfilled Promise of Communism.” In her book, Ghodsee interviews women who were at the forefront of making these improvements in the lives […]
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About Soviet Union Photography

soviet union photography
Harvey and Alice Richards, 1953. Photo by Imogen Cunningham

Harvey and Alice Richards Soviet Union photography contains two Soviet Union documentary videos made in 1961 focusing on women and children in a socialist society: A Visit to the Soviet Union, Part 1: Women of Russia (27 min.), and Part 2: Far From Moscow (20 min.).  I accompanied them, at age 17, to help with the batteries and heavy equipment.  It was my first airplane ride and a remarkable experience. We visited Moscow, Sochi on the Black Sea coast, Tashkent, Uzbekistan, and Irkutsk in Siberia.

Harvey and Alice’ films are simple accounts of social services and life styles of women and children in the Soviet Union in 1961.  When we returned, Harvey and Alice projected the films for small groups to let sympathetic people see what was happening in the the USSR to build friendly public opinion instead of Cold War.  When I told people of my trip to the USSR, more often than not, I was greeted by blank stares and the question, What did you go there for?  Elsa Knight Thompson interviewed me on KPFA radio and then, the whole subject dropped into oblivion.

Now, 52 years later, and 20 years after the collapse of the Soviet Union, these films are experiencing a rebirth.  As part of creating this web site in 2011 to make Harvey’s films available, I made short clips from each film which I put up on YouTube and then embedded in my posts about the films.  I entitled the clips Ordinary Life in the USSR, 1961. As of September, 2017, over 470,000 viewers have visited my YouTube channel, including over 300,000 views of the Ordinary Life in the USSR clips alone.  Viewers have come from 120 countries.  Debates about the USSR abound on the comments section on YouTube.

This is the last thing I expected to happen.  Now I realize that in the world today, especially outside the propagandized USA, there is widespread curiosity about women and children in the Soviet period. The experience of Russians since the USSR’s collapse fuels this interest as social services disappeared along with full employment and socialized medical care. Whatever one thinks of the Russian Revolution, Stalin, Lenin, Trotsky, or communism, the history of care and relative prosperity experienced by women and children during the Soviet period is now a lasting legacy.

Their two Soviet Union films present images helping to restart the thinking of people around the world on what governments and societies should provide for people.  All of this happened after Harvey and Alice passed away.  I am sure they would have rejoiced at this development, as I do.

Soviet Union Photography

Soviet Union Images Galleries exhibit photos that Harvey Richards took during the making of his and his wife, Alice Richards’ films about women and children in the Soviet Union (USSR) in 1961: A Visit to the Soviet Union, Part 1: Women of Russia(27 min.), and Part 2: Far From Moscow (20 min.).  I accompanied them, at age 17, to help carry the batteries and heavy equipment. Along the way, Harvey Richards captured still images of ordinary life in the Soviet Union which are presented in the galleries below. These photos, now, over 50 years later, and 20 years after the collapse of the Soviet Union, show a slice of ordinary life in a socialist country, focused mainly on the lives of women and children.

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